16 Cossacks, Russians deprived of Russia (Eng… by alexeykh

Русские без России, Фильм 6-й. “Казаки: неразделенная любовь” (Cossacks, Unrequited Love)
The documentary follows the lives of Russian Civil War emigres of the First Wave. It seeks to disclose their motives for leaving, to reveal their lives beyond the borders of their native land, to explore their contribution to the Russian and world cultures. The authors take an inquisitive look at the lives of White Army generals Vrangel, Denikin.
Nikita Mikhalkov’s “Русские без России” (literally, Russians without Russia) documents the stories of the Russian commanders of the White Army and their men after the Civil War in Russia following the Bolshevik Revolution. Interviews with descendants of these leaders and those who chose to leave Russia for better times in Western Europe after 1921 are featured, often in conversation with Nikita Mikhalkov himself.

Цикл “Русские без России” открывает новые страницы, связанные с трагической историей первой русской эмиграции. Документальный сериал снят к печальной дате – 90-летию русского исхода. Документальный фильм Никиты Михалкова «Русские без России» посвящён нелёгким судьбам российских эмигрантов так называемой «первой волны». Многие из них внесли большой вклад как в российскую, так и в мировую культуру. Белогвардейские генералы Колчак, Врангель и Деникин, поэт Туроверов, писатель Шмелёв… Авторы попытались исследовать мотивы поступков этих людей и проследить их жизненные пути, сложившиеся уже за пределами Родины.
Таким образом, сквозь призму нескольких отдельно взятых судеб вырисовывается трагедия в масштабах всего российского народа, когда культура как будто раскололась и пошла по двум дорогам, а глубокая рана так и не зажила до сих пор…

 


15 Russian Fleet, Russians without Russia (Eng… by alexeykh

Русские без России, Фильм 5-й. “Гибель Русской эскадры” (The Russian Fleet tragedy)

The documentary follows the lives of Russian Civil War emigres of the First Wave. It seeks to disclose their motives for leaving, to reveal their lives beyond the borders of their native land, to explore their contribution to the Russian and world cultures. The authors take an inquisitive look at the lives of White Army generals Vrangel, Denikin.
Nikita Mikhalkov’s “Русские без России” (literally, Russians without Russia) documents the stories of the Russian commanders of the White Army and their men after the Civil War in Russia following the Bolshevik Revolution. Interviews with descendants of these leaders and those who chose to leave Russia for better times in Western Europe after 1921 are featured, often in conversation with Nikita Mikhalkov himself.

Цикл “Русские без России” открывает новые страницы, связанные с трагической историей первой русской эмиграции. Документальный сериал снят к печальной дате – 90-летию русского исхода. Документальный фильм Никиты Михалкова «Русские без России» посвящён нелёгким судьбам российских эмигрантов так называемой «первой волны». Многие из них внесли большой вклад как в российскую, так и в мировую культуру. Белогвардейские генералы Колчак, Врангель и Деникин, поэт Туроверов, писатель Шмелёв… Авторы попытались исследовать мотивы поступков этих людей и проследить их жизненные пути, сложившиеся уже за пределами Родины.
Таким образом, сквозь призму нескольких отдельно взятых судеб вырисовывается трагедия в масштабах всего российского народа, когда культура как будто раскололась и пошла по двум дорогам, а глубокая рана так и не зажила до сих пор…

 

downloadarsenyWe are pleased to announce that Arseny Kruglov (bass) Choir Director of the 184071.pCathedral of the Dormition of the Mother of God and Holy Royal Martyrs in Chiswick (London) will lead the singing of the Akathist to the Mother of God at the Orthodox Church in Bentham on Thursday 18th May, 6-8pm
===
Arseny, who is also co-founder of Ensemble Arto Doxo, received a classical musical education in St. Petersburg (Russia), where he graduated from the College of Music (named after Rachmaninoff), studying piano and trombone. At the same time, Arseny also completed a course in sacred music at the world-famous Valaam Monastery. He subsequently completed his vocal training under various famous St. Petersburg singing teachers and practitioners. Arseny began his active singing career in 1996, and since then has3f39644 been a member of several different professional ensembles, ranging from church choirs to secular academic12552774_1541859999464370_8758098978850866345_n choirs. During this time, he participated in choral festivals and concerts both in Russia and in Europe. Arseny is no stranger to our Parish, previously posted in Cheltenham on business he has helped our fledgling choir and is now recognised as the mainstay of our Cathedral Choir. He will also visit other parishes receiving Vladyka Bishop Irenei and the icon including Liverpool, Cardiff and Oxford in addition to our parish of Holy Prince Vladimir in Bentham, near Cheltenham.
Singing with a quarter at Bentham a few years back.

Singing with a quarter at Bentham a few years back.


14 Russian Fleet, Russians without Russia (Eng… by alexeykh

Русские без России, Фильм 5-й. “Гибель Русской эскадры” (The Russian Fleet tragedy)

The documentary follows the lives of Russian Civil War emigres of the First Wave. It seeks to disclose their motives for leaving, to reveal their lives beyond the borders of their native land, to explore their contribution to the Russian and world cultures. The authors take an inquisitive look at the lives of White Army generals Vrangel, Denikin.
Nikita Mikhalkov’s “Русские без России” (literally, Russians without Russia) documents the stories of the Russian commanders of the White Army and their men after the Civil War in Russia following the Bolshevik Revolution. Interviews with descendants of these leaders and those who chose to leave Russia for better times in Western Europe after 1921 are featured, often in conversation with Nikita Mikhalkov himself.

Цикл “Русские без России” открывает новые страницы, связанные с трагической историей первой русской эмиграции. Документальный сериал снят к печальной дате – 90-летию русского исхода. Документальный фильм Никиты Михалкова «Русские без России» посвящён нелёгким судьбам российских эмигрантов так называемой «первой волны». Многие из них внесли большой вклад как в российскую, так и в мировую культуру. Белогвардейские генералы Колчак, Врангель и Деникин, поэт Туроверов, писатель Шмелёв… Авторы попытались исследовать мотивы поступков этих людей и проследить их жизненные пути, сложившиеся уже за пределами Родины.
Таким образом, сквозь призму нескольких отдельно взятых судеб вырисовывается трагедия в масштабах всего российского народа, когда культура как будто раскололась и пошла по двум дорогам, а глубокая рана так и не зажила до сих пор…

 

 

232590.p…пойдите и увидите! мироточивой Иверской иконой Божией Матери посетит Челтнем Четверг 18 мая 1800-2000 ч.
• The Miracle-Working Myrrh-Streaming “Hawaiian-Iveron” Icon of the Mother of God will be visiting the United Kingdom from 12th – 21st May and we are to be Blessed by a visit to our parish of Holy Prince Vladimir:
• Thursday 18th May, 1800-2000hrs: Orthodox Church, Bentham Lane, Bentham, Gloucestershire GL3 4UD
His Grace, Bishop Irenei of Sacramento, Russian Orthodox Church Abroad, Fr Paul Elliott, Chancellor of our Diocese, Protodeacon Father Denis Lvov from the Catgedral of the Sign, New York City, together with Subdeacon Nectarios Yangson, keeper and guardian of the famous Hawaiian Icon of the Mother of God, where a Moleben (prayer service) and Akathist to the Mother of God will be sung.
www.russianchurchcheltenham.org.uk
• Donations requested

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The Iveron Icon, which at present is preserved in a monastery on Mount Athos, was according to tradition painted by the Apostle and Evangelist Luke.

The Panagia Portaitissa, or Iveron icon of the Mother of God, Mt. Athos.

The Panagia Portaitissa, or Iveron icon of the Mother of God, Mt. Athos.

It is traditionally called the Panagia Portaitissa (“She who resides by the door” or “Keeper of the gate”), and was, according to tradition, painted by the Apostle and Evangelist Saint Luke. It is commonly known by many as the Iveron icon, because of its location in the Iveron Monastery on Mt. Athos. The icon miraculously survived the iconoclasm of Emperor Theophilus (829–842) in Byzantium—a pious widow hid it in her house, and when soldiers came to destroy icons at the emperor’s orders, they found this one and pierced it with a spear. But to their great horror, blood flowed from the wound. The mark is depicted in all copies that have since been painted of this icon.

To save the icon from further violence, after long prayer the widow cast the icon into the sea. It sailed to the holy mountain of Athos, the “Garden of the Panagia”. The monks one day saw a pillar of light over the sea, and looking closer, beheld the icon of the Theotokos. Only one monk, however, was worthy of receiving it into his hands—the Georgian monk Gabriel from the Iveron monastery. (The Iveron Monastery was so named because it was a Georgian monastery, “Iveron” or Iberia being the name of their homeland, Georgia). The icon was placed in the church, but the Mother of God informed the monks that she wished her icon to be placed over the gates, and thus the icon came to be known as “Keeper of the gate”.

In 1648, news of this wonder-working Icon reached Russia through pilgrims who had visited Mt. Athos. Then Patriarch Nikon of Moscow commissioned an exact copy of the Iveron icon to be made and sent to Russia. Almost immediately upon its arrival on October 13 [October 26, new style], the icon was glorified with numerous miracles attributed to it by the faithful. This day is still commemorated as the feast of the Translation of the Iveron icon to Moscow. The Iveron Chapel was built in 1669 to enshrine the icon next to the Kremlin walls in Moscow. The chapel was the main entrance to Red Square and traditionally everyone, from the Tsar down to the lowest peasant would stop there to venerate the icon before entering the square. After the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, the chapel was destroyed by the Bolsheviks and the fate of the icon is unknown to this day. A new copy was made on Mt. Athos in recent years, and placed in the newly restored Iveron chapel by the gates of the Kremlin, where Akathists to the Mother of God are served from morning to evening daily.

Another newer version of the famous Portaitissa is the Myrrh-streaming icon from Montreal in Canada.

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In November 1982, a copy of the Iveron Icon of the Mother God began to stream myrrh in Canada. In 1983, the Icon was in Washington for the first time, and I then asked its guardian, the Spaniard José Muñoz, how he had received the Holy Object, and when it had begun to stream myrrh. Here are his own words, which were recorded during our conversation with him:

“Once during our pilgrimage on Athos, after several hours of walking, we got lost. It began to get dark. We needed quickly to find shelter for the night. Going along a path, we stumbled upon a small, poor skete. There the fourteen Greek monks of the skete were engaged in iconography. They received us very cordially. Having rested a little, we began to examine the icons of their work. One of my fellow travellers, who spoke Greek, got into a conversation with the monks and told them who we were and where we were from. I, though, taking advantage of the moment, began more attentively to examine everything round about. Suddenly my gaze stopped at an icon of marvelous artistry with dimensions of approximately fifteen by twenty inches. I asked a monk if he could not sell it to me. He refused, having explained that this image was the first to be painted in that skete and therefore could not be sold. I could not tear my eyes from that wondrous icon. We stayed the whole night in the skete and in the morning stood through the Liturgy. During the singing of “It is truly meet”, I begged the Queen of Heaven on my knees to let the Holy Image go with me… Bidding farewell in the morning, all the monks accompanied us, but the hegoumen [abbot.—O.C.] was not among them. And then at the last minute before our departure from the monastery we saw him: he quickly descended the staircase with the wrapped-up icon in his hands. He came up to me and said, “Take it. I am gifting it to you. It must be with you.” I offered to pay for the icon, knowing that the monks were needy; but the hegoumen said severely, “One must not take money for such a holy object!” I crossed myself, kissed the image and made a vow to myself that that image would never become the source of my enrichment…

“After this, we set out at once for Iveron Monastery in order to receive the superior’s blessing and to touch the icon received by me to the original, which is preserved in this famed monastery. But by far not everyone is allowed to approach and touch the ancient wonderworking icon. Glory be to God, we were permitted! In the chapel, we knelt, and gazing at the holy object, froze in prayer before the image of the Iveron Mother of God. The image was so majestic, so shiningly beautiful, and radiated such spiritual power that it was difficult to gaze at it for long! A hieromonk helped me touch my copy to the Original.

“Soon after this we went home to Canada. We returned on November 3, 1982. I put the icon next to the relics of the saints of the Kiev Caves Lavra and the New-martyr Elizabeth Feodorovna, which I had received from the reposed Archbishop Leonty of Chile. A lampada flickered before it all the time, and each day before sleep I read Akathists to it. On the 24th of November, I was awakened at three o’clock in the morning by the powerful aroma of roses—the whole room was filled with it. At first I thought that it emanated from the relics or from a spilt vial of perfume; but upon approaching the icon, I was struck! The whole icon was covered with oil—a fragrant oil! I froze on the spot at such a miracle!”

Consolation of the faithful

Upon the advice of a local Orthodox clergyman, the Icon was taken to church and placed on the altar. During the entire liturgy, myrrh flowed from the hands of the Christ Child. Since that time, with the exception of several days during Holy Week, when the Icon is absolutely dry, the myrrh has continued to flow almost uninterruptedly. (Holy Myrrh is a sweet, fragrant oil which was used in the Old Testament for the anointing of kings. In contemporary Orthodox church practice, a newly born Christian is anointed with Holy Myrrh during which the words “The seal of the gift of the Holy Spirit” are said by the priest.)

In the years since, Jose traveled to many cities and parishes where the Icon was venerated to the great joy and consolation of the faithful.

Wherever the Icon went, there are always many questions. Some people initially had doubts. A scientist in Miami was astounded to see that the back of the Icon remained perfectly dry. He later surreptitiously chipped off a small piece of the board on which the Icon is painted for scientific analysis: it was found to be ordinary pinewood, nothing more.

At some times the myrrh would flow in greater abundance than at others. During the consecration of a bishop in Montreal there was such an outpouring of the myrrh that it streamed down from the analogion (lectern on which icons are kept in Orthodox churches) onto the floor. On another occasion, in Florida, the myrrh was seen to rise forth from the hands of the Mother of God and the Christ Child as though it were being pressed from within. Nobody had any power to regulate the flow of the myrrh, it would move at the will of God and His Most Pure Mother.

The Icon was kept in a frame about two inches deep and measures about 12 by 18 inches. At first the myrrh flowed only from the hands of the Mother of God, from the star on Her left shoulder and, occasionally, from the hands of Our Lord Jesus Christ. Yet in March 1985, during a Lenten service, even the frame and glass of the Icon began to exude myrrh in such quantities, that the cloth of the analogion on which it lay was totally saturated. There was always a layer of cotton wool placed at the base of the Icon to absorb the myrrh: pieces of this cotton were distributed to the faithful.

Although there have already been several cases of physical healing (not only among Orthodox, but Catholics and Protestants, too), the purpose of the Mother of God seemed to be directed more at the healing of souls. Many who have stood before the Icon have testified to this, experiencing not only compunction and repentance, but consolation as well.

As mentioned earlier, the flow of myrrh would cease during Holy Week. It would cease on Holy Monday. After the Liturgy on the morning of Great Saturday, a light dew of myrrh would form on the Icon, its case and protecting glass. During Matins (the midnight service at which the glorious Resurrection of Our Lord is proclaimed), when the procession of clergy and faithful, holding icons and banners, would leave the church, the Icon would begin to exude myrrh in such quantities, that it would cover the hands of the person carrying it.

This is not the first time that the Orthodox Church has witnessed such a miracle. In the nineteenth century the Surety-of-Sinners Icon in Moscow exuded myrrh with which the sick were anointed and received healing. Earlier, there was a myrrh-streaming icon of the Mother of God in the Tolga monastery in Yaroslavl; and there have been others.

What is the meaning of this extraordinary manifestation of God’s grace in our time? It has been observed that in the history of the Church such miracles have occurred in times of great tribulation; we saw this in the Apostolic times, and, more recently, in Russia, where the Church suffered cruel persecution for 70 years. The miracles strengthen the faithful and prepare them to endure trials. The appearance of the myrrh-streaming Icon in our time may well signify a period of further great trials for the Russian Orthodox Church and, at the same time, offer consolation that the Mother of God will be a Protectress of the faithful: Unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall much be required.

The death of Brother Jose and the loss of the icon

José Muñoz lived a monastic life, and some say he was secretly tonsured. He spent his entire life after the miraculous manifestation of the icon taking it to different parishes the world over for veneration by the faithful, and when he was at home he prayed continuously before it, commemorating names sent by people requesting prayers. But such an angelic man soon became ripe for the Kingdom of Heaven, and on October 31, 1997 he died a martyric death. In a hotel in Athens, where he was staying before returning home from a grace-filled pilgrimage to the holy places of Greece, this servant of God and His Most Pure Mother was brutally tortured and murdered by unknown Romanian criminals. Although he had not taken the Icon with him to Greece, the whereabouts of the miraculous, myrrh-streaming Icon are still unknown.

However the Mother of God did not leave her children without this consolation, and just before the tenth anniversary of Brother Jose’s death, a printed paper copy of the Montreal icon began streaming myrrh in Hawaii. Now this icon is taken to parishes, bringing consolation and reconciliation.

In June of 2008, the “Hawaiian” Myrrh-streaming Iveron Icon was officially recognized by the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia as miraculous and worthy of veneration, and was given the blessing to travel to the various churches and monasteries of Holy Orthodoxy. The original “owner” of the Icon, Reader Nectarios, was charged by the Russian Orthodox Church to be Her guardian, and provide for the safety and care of this Wonderworking Icon of Christ’s Holy Church.

Holy Brother José, remember us also in your prayers where you abide in the Heavenly Kingdom!

get the full pictureGet the full picture ! We speak your language – the Russian Church Abroad Diocese in Great Britain and Ireland is served by clergy from Bulgaria, England, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, New Zealand, Poland, Romania, Russia, Scotland, Ukraine, Wales
Find out more about our Diocese here:
http://www.rocor.org.uk/


13 Russian Fleet, Russians without Russia (Eng… by alexeykh

 

Русские без России, Фильм 5-й. “Гибель Русской эскадры” (The Russian Fleet tragedy)
The documentary follows the lives of Russian Civil War emigres of the First Wave. It seeks to disclose their motives for leaving, to reveal their lives beyond the borders of their native land, to explore their contribution to the Russian and world cultures. The authors take an inquisitive look at the lives of White Army generals Vrangel, Denikin.
Nikita Mikhalkov’s “Русские без России” (literally, Russians without Russia) documents the stories of the Russian commanders of the White Army and their men after the Civil War in Russia following the Bolshevik Revolution. Interviews with descendants of these leaders and those who chose to leave Russia for better times in Western Europe after 1921 are featured, often in conversation with Nikita Mikhalkov himself.

Цикл “Русские без России” открывает новые страницы, связанные с трагической историей первой русской эмиграции. Документальный сериал снят к печальной дате – 90-летию русского исхода. Документальный фильм Никиты Михалкова «Русские без России» посвящён нелёгким судьбам российских эмигрантов так называемой «первой волны». Многие из них внесли большой вклад как в российскую, так и в мировую культуру. Белогвардейские генералы Колчак, Врангель и Деникин, поэт Туроверов, писатель Шмелёв… Авторы попытались исследовать мотивы поступков этих людей и проследить их жизненные пути, сложившиеся уже за пределами Родины.
Таким образом, сквозь призму нескольких отдельно взятых судеб вырисовывается трагедия в масштабах всего российского народа, когда культура как будто раскололась и пошла по двум дорогам, а глубокая рана так и не зажила до сих пор…

pascha Bentham
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BENTHAM CHURCH…(Cheltenham, Greek Orthodox Parish of St John Chrysostom; language Greek & English, Diocese: Thyateira)
Priest: Fr Nicholas Karafillides
www.russianchurchcheltenham.org.uk
www.greekorthodoxcheltenham.org.uk
Sunday 9 April Palm Sunday 09.00-12.00
Thursday 13 April – GREAT AND HOLY THURSDAY
Service of the Holy Passion of our Lord
and Saviour Jesus Christ 19.00-22.30
Friday 14 April – GREAT AND HOLY FRIDAY
Morning – Service of the Great Hours and Great Vespers 09.30-13.00
Evening – Service of the Epitaphios 19.00-22.30
Saturday 15 April – GREAT AND HOLY SATURDAY
Morning – Great Vespers and Divine Liturgy of St Basil 10.00-13.00
Evening – The Life Giving Resurrection of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ 23.00-02.30
Sunday 23 April
Second Sunday of Pascha – Sunday of Thomas 09.00-12.00
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BIRMINGHAM CHURCH…(Edgbaston, Russian Orthodox Parish of All Saints of Britain and Ireland; language Church Slavonic & English, Diocese: Sourozh)
Priest: Fr Mikhail Gogoleff
www.birmingham-sourozh.org.uk
Thursday 13th April at 18:00 (Great Thursday, Lecture of twelve Passion Gospels)
Friday 14th April at 18:00 (Great Friday, Passion of Jesus Christ). Burial of Christ Veneration of Epitaphios celebrated during Vespers and Matins. Confessions will be on Friday 14th April from 4pm and Saturday 15th April from 12:30 till 4pm. There will be no confessions before or after the Paschal Liturgy in the evening.Saturday 15th April at 21:00 (GLORIOUS RESURRECTION OF CHRIST – PASCHA). Liturgy of St John followed by food Blessing.
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BRISTOL CHURCH…(Frenchay, Russian Orthodox Parish of the Holy Trinity; language Church Slavonic & English, Diocese: Sourozh)
Priest: Fr Mikhail Gogoleff
www.bristol-sourozh.org.uk
Sunday 9 April: 6th week of Great Lent, Entry of the Lord to Jerusalem, Palm Sunday. St John Liturgy at 10.30
Monday 10 April: Passion Week, Holy Monday, Liturgy of Presanctified Gifts at 18.00. Confessions start at 17.00.
Wednesday 12 April: Passion Week. Holy Wednesday, Unction Service at 18.00. Confessions start at 17.00.
Thursday 13 April: Commemoration of the Last Mystical Supper. St Basil Liturgy at 10.30
Sunday 16 April: GLORIOUS RESURRECTION OF CHRIST – PASCHA at 12.00 (Midday). Pascal service followed by food blessing.
Monday 17 April: Bright Paschal Week. St John Liturgy at 10.30
Sunday 30 April: Holy Myrrh Bearing Women, St Tamara of Georgia and St Agapit Pope of Rome. St John Liturgy at 10.30
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LONDON CATHEDRAL…(Chiswick, Russian Orthodox Church Abroad; Cathedral Parish of the Dormition & Holy Royal Martyrs; language Church Slavonic & English, Diocese: ROCOR)
Priests: Fr Peter Baulk; Fr Vitaly Serepinas
www.russianchurchlondon.org
Sunday, April 9
Palm Sunday. The Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem
08:30 – Confession
10:00 – The Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom
Monday, April 10
Great Monday
09:00 – Hours, Typika, Vespers with the Liturgy of the Pre-sanctified Gifts
Thursday, April 13
Great Thursday. Commemoration of the Last Supper
09:00 – Hours (3, 6, 9), Vespers with Holy Liturgy of St. Basil the Great
18:15 – Matins, Reading of the12 Passion Gospels                                                                                                                             Friday, April 14                                                                                                                                                                                         Great and Holy Good Friday. No Liturgy. Strict Fast

08:00 – Royal Hours
16:00 – Vespers, Bringing out of the Burial Shroud
18:15 – Matins, Lamentations and Procession of the Shroud of Christ
Saturday, April 15
Great Saturday
08:00 – Hours (3, 6, 9), Typika, Vespers with the Divine Liturgy of St. Basil the Great
18:00 – Blessing of Easter food baskets and eggs
23:30 – Midnight Office
Sunday, April 16
00:00 – Easter Matins, followed by the Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom
The Bright and Glorious Resurrection of Christ
10:00 – Divine Liturgy
17:00 – Agape Vespers

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OXFORD CHURCH…(Marston, Russian Orthodox Parish of St Nicholas; language Church Slavonic & English, Diocese: Sourozh)
Priests: Fr Stephen Platt; Fr Tikhon Vasiliyev
www.stnicholas-oxford.org
PALM SUNDAY
10:30am
Divine Liturgy (E&S)
6:00pm
Bridegroom Matins
Monday, April 10
HOLY WEEK
9:00am
Gospel Reading & Liturgy of the Presanctified
6:00pm
Bridegroom Matins
Tuesday, April 11
HOLY WEEK
9:00am
Gospel Reading & Liturgy of the Presanctified
6:00pm
Bridegroom Matins
Wednesday, April 12
HOLY WEEK
Great & Holy Wednesday
9:00am
Gospel Reading & Liturgy of the Presanctified
6:00pm
Sacrament of Holy Anointing
Thursday, April 13
HOLY WEEK
Great & Holy Thursday
9:00am
Vespers and Liturgy of St Basil the Great
6:00pm
Matins of the Passion (12 Gospels)
Friday, April 14
HOLY WEEK
Great and Holy Friday
2:00pm
Vespers and carrying out of the Shroud of Christ
6:00pm
Matins of the Burial of Christ
Saturday, April 15
HOLY WEEK
Holy and Great Saturday
9:00am
Vespers and Liturgy of St Basil the Great
10:30pm
Reading of Acts of the Apostles
11:30pm
Compline and Easter Matins
Sunday, April 16
» 1:30am
Compline and Easter Matins
Pascha – Resurrection of the Lord
1:30am
PASCHAL LITURGY
10:30am
NO MORNING LITURGY
1:00pm
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12 Wrangel, Russians deprived of Russia (Eng… by alexeykh

Русские без России,  Фильм 4-й. “Генерал Врангель. Когда мы уйдем” (General Wrangel. When will we leave)

The documentary follows the lives of Russian Civil War emigres of the First Wave. It seeks to disclose their motives for leaving, to reveal their lives beyond the borders of their native land, to explore their contribution to the Russian and world cultures. The authors take an inquisitive look at the lives of White Army generals Vrangel, Denikin.
Nikita Mikhalkov’s “Русские без России” (literally, Russians without Russia) documents the stories of the Russian commanders of the White Army and their men after the Civil War in Russia following the Bolshevik Revolution. Featured in this film are Kolchak, Denikin, and Wrangel and their contributions to the Russian Empire before and during WWI, and their fate after the victory of the Bolsheviks. Interviews with descendants of these leaders and those who chose to leave Russia for better times in Western Europe after 1921 are featured, often in conversation with Nikita Mikhalkov himself.

Цикл “Русские без России” открывает новые страницы, связанные с трагической историей первой русской эмиграции. Документальный сериал снят к печальной дате – 90-летию русского исхода. Документальный фильм Никиты Михалкова «Русские без России» посвящён нелёгким судьбам российских эмигрантов так называемой «первой волны». Многие из них внесли большой вклад как в российскую, так и в мировую культуру. Белогвардейские генералы Колчак, Врангель и Деникин, поэт Туроверов, писатель Шмелёв… Авторы попытались исследовать мотивы поступков этих людей и проследить их жизненные пути, сложившиеся уже за пределами Родины.
Таким образом, сквозь призму нескольких отдельно взятых судеб вырисовывается трагедия в масштабах всего российского народа, когда культура как будто раскололась и пошла по двум дорогам, а глубокая рана так и не зажила до сих пор…

THE TRIODION

The Crucifixion, fragment (Studenica Monastery, Serbia).
The Crucifixion, fragment (Studenica Monastery, Serbia).

542733_509681439090212_238096299_nGreat Lent is the 40-day season of spiritual preparation that comes before the most important Feast of the Christian year, Holy Pascha (which means “Passover” and is commonly called “Easter”,). It is the central part of a larger time of preparation called the Triodion season.

The Triodion begins ten weeks before Easter and is divided into three main parts: three Pre-Lenten weeks of preparing our hearts, the six weeks of Lent, and Holy Week. The main theme of the Triodion is repentance—mankind’s return to God, our loving Father.

This annual season of repentance is a spiritual journey with our Savior. Our goal is to meet the risen Lord Jesus, Who reunites us with God the Father. The Father is always waiting to greet us with outstretched hands. We must ask ourselves the question, “Are we willing to turn to Him?”

During Great Lent, the Church teaches us how to re­ceive Him by using the two great means of repentance— prayer and fasting.

THE LENTEN FAST

The word “fast” means not eating all or certain foods. As Orthodox Faithful, we can fast completely at certain times of great importance, and especially each time before receiv­ing Holy Communion. Usually, fasting means limiting the number of meals and/or the type of food eaten.

The purpose of fasting is to remind us of the Scriptural teaching, “Man does not live by bread alone.” The needs of the body are nothing compared to the needs of the soul. Above all else, we need God, Who provides everything for both the body and the soul. Fasting teaches us to depend on God more fully.

The first sin of our parents, Adam and Eve, was eating from the forbidden tree (Genesis 3:1-19). We fast from food, or a food item, as a reminder that we are to fast from sin­ning and doing evil.

There are several benefits of fasting. Fasting helps us pray more easily. Our spirit is lighter when we are not weighed down by too much food or food that is too rich. Through fasting, we also learn to feel compassion for the poor and hungry and to save our own resources so that we can help those in need.

Fasting is more than not eating food. Saint John Chrysostom teaches that it is more important to fast from sin. For example, besides controlling what goes into our mouths, we must control what comes out of our mouths as well. Are our words pleasing to God, or do we curse God or our brother?

The other members of the body also need to fast: our eyes from seeing evil, our ears from hearing evil, our limbs from participating in anything that is not of God. Most important of all, we need to control our thoughts, for thoughts are the source of our actions, whether good or evil.

Fasting is not an end in itself. Our goal is an inner change of heart. The Lenten Fast is called “ascetic.” This refers to a ctions of self-denial and spiritual training which are central to fasting.

Fasting is a spiritual exercise. It is not imposed or forced upon us. In the same way that true repentance cannot be forced upon anyone, each of us makes the choice to turn away from our sinful ways and go toward our loving, for giving Father in Heaven.

THE PRELENTEN WEEKS

Before Great Lent begins, four Sunday lessons prepare us for the Fast. Humility is the theme of the first Sunday, called the Sunday of the Publican and the Pharisee. The Lord’s parable in Luke 18:10-14 teaches that fasting with pride is rejected by God. For this reason, there is no fasting the week following this Sunday. This includes no fasting on Wednesday

and Friday that week. (Wednesdays and Fridays are usually fast days throughout the year—Wednesday’s Fast recalls the betrayal of Christ by Judas; Friday’s Fast commemorates the Lord’s Crucifixion.)

Repentance is the theme of the second Pre-Lenten Sunday, called the Sunday of the Prodigal Son. Before we can return to God, we need to recognize that we are far from God because of sin. Like the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32), we are in a self-imposed exile. Will we come to our senses as did the Prodigal Son and return to our Father?

The next Sunday is called both Meatfare Sunday and the Sunday of the Last Judgment. The second name refers to the Gospel lesson (Matthew 25:31-4 6) read on this day. The Lord tells us we will be judged at the end according to the love we have shown for our brother. “I was hungry..thirsty..naked…a stranger…in prison…sick… What­ever you did for one of the least of these brothers of Mine you did for Me.” Almsgiving goes hand in hand with fast­ing. This Sunday is called Meatfare because it is the last day meat, fish or poultry is eaten before Easter, for those keep­ing the Lenten Fast.

The last Pre-Lenten Sunday is called both Cheesefare Sunday and the Sunday of Forgiveness. This is the last day dairy products are eaten before the Fast. The Gospel lesson (Matthew 6:14-21 ) read on this day tells us that our fast must not be hypocritical or “for show.” Our work and our appearance are to continue as usual and our extra efforts are to be known only by God. The Gospel reading also reminds us that God the Father will forgive us in the same manner as we forgive our brother. With this promise of forgiveness, Great Lent begins on the next day, which is called Clean Monday. Clean Monday is a total fast day, except for a little water. No other beverages or food are taken.

GENERAL RULES OF THE LENTEN FAST

The Lenten Fast rules that we observe today were established within the monasteries of the Orthodox Church during the sixth through eleventh centuries. These rules are intended for all Orthodox Christians, not just monks and nuns.

The first week of Lent is especially strict. On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, a total fast is kept. In practice, very few people are able to do this. Some find it necessary to eat a little each day after sunset. Many Faithful do fast com­pletely on Monday and then eat only uncooked food (bread, fruit, nuts) on Tuesday evening. On Wednesday, the fast is kept until after the Presanctified Liturgy.

From the second through the sixth weeks of Lent, the general rules for fasting are practiced. Meat, animal prod­ucts(cheese, milk, butter, eggs, lard), fish (meaning fish with backbones), olive oil and wine (all alcoholic drinks) are not consumed during the weekdays of Great Lent. Octopus and shell-fish are allowed, as is vegetable oil. On weekends, ol­ive oil and wine are permitted.

According to what was done in the monasteries, one meal a day is eaten on weekdays and two meals on weekends of

Great Lent. No restriction is placed on the amount of food during the meal, though moderation is always encouraged in all areas of one’s life at all times.

Fish, oil and wine are allowed on the Feast of the An­nunciation (March 25) and on Palm Sunday (one week before Easter). On other feast days, such as the First and Second Finding of the Head of Saint John the Baptist (February 24) , the Holy Forty Martyrs of Sebaste (March 9), the Forefeast of the Annunciation (March 24) and the Synaxis of the Archangel Gabriel (March 26), wine and oil are permitted.

HOLY WEEK

The week before Easter, Holy Week, is a special time of fasting separate from Great Lent. Like the first week, a strict fast is kept. Some Orthodox Christians try to keep a total fast on Holy Monday, Holy Tuesday and Holy Wednesday. Most eat a simple Lenten meal at the end of each day before going to the evening Church services.

On Holy Thursday, wine is allowed in remembrance of the Last Supper. Holy Friday is kept as a strict fast day, as is Holy Saturday . Holy Saturday is the only Saturday in the entire year when oil is not permitted.

In short, these are the Lenten rules for fasting. Traditionally, the Church Fathers recommend that someone new to fasting begin by resolving to faithfully do as much as he or she is able during the Lenten period. Each year as one matures as a Christian, a fuller participation can be under­taken. However, it is not recommended that a person try to create their own rules for fasting, since this would not be obedient or wise. The Faithful are encouraged to consult with their priest or bishop regarding the Fast when possible.

Personal factors such as one’s health and living situation need to be considered as well. For example, an isolated Or­thodox Christian required to eat meals at their place of employment, school or in prison may not be able to avoid certain foods. The Church understands this and extends leniency.

It is important to keep in mind that fasting is not a law for us—rather, a voluntary way of remembering to not sin and do evil, and to help keep our focus on prayer, repentance and doing acts of kindness, for we “are not under the law but under grace” (Romans 6:14).

EASTER, BRIGHT WEEK AND THE PASCHAL SEASON

The Lenten Fast is broken following the midnight Easter service. With the proclamation, “Christ is risen!” the time of feasting begins. The week after Easter is called Bright Week and there is no fasting. For the next 40 days, the Church celebrates the Paschal (Easter) season. Joy and thanksgiving are the fulfillment of our Lenten journey.

A PRAYER FOR LENT

The Prayer of Saint Ephraim the Syrian is traditionally said many times throughout each day during Great Lent, in addition to our daily prayers.

O Lord and Master of my life, take from me the spirit of sloth, faintheartedness, lust of power, and idle talk. (+)

But give rather the spirit of chastity, humility, patience and love to your servant. (+)

Yes, O Lord and King, grant me to see my own sin and not to judge my brother, for You are blessed from all ages to all ages. Amen. (+)

(The “(‘+)“ indicates that those praying make a deep bow or prostration at this point.)

 

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